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Số người truy cập: 74,188,256

 Experimental Modeling of Wave Forces and Hydrodynamics on Elevated Coastal Structures Subject to Waves, Surge or Tsunamis: The Effect of Breaking, Shielding and Debris
Tác giả hoặc Nhóm tác giả: Pedro LomonacoMohammad Shafiqual Alam, Pedro Arduino, Andre Barbosa, Daniel T. Cox, Oregon State University, Trung Do, Marc Eberhard, Michael Motley, Krishnendu Shekhar, Tori Tomiczek,Hyoungsu Park, John W. van de Lindt, Andrew Winter
Nơi đăng: Coastal Engineering 2018 - 36th International Conference; Số: ICCE2018;Từ->đến trang: 1-3;Năm: 2018
Lĩnh vực: Khoa học công nghệ; Loại: Báo cáo; Thể loại: Quốc tế
TÓM TẮT
Coastal communities provide important economic, transport, and recreational services to large numbers of people worldwide. However, these coastal communities are vulnerable to damage by extreme events such as tropical cyclones or tsunamis. Waves and surge, as well as tsunami-wave events, may cause extensive damage to elevated structures through a combination of horizontal and vertical wave and surge-induced forces. Structural elevation has been shown to be a critical variable affecting damage and loss. Recent efforts have been made to retrofit structures or improve coastal protection and damage mitigation plans in coastal communities to increase community resilience. However, to effectively retrofit old structures or design new structures to resist damage due to hurricanes or tsunamis, engineers require an accurate estimation of both the wave hydrodynamics and the resulting loads. Several theoretical, empirical, numerical, and experimental studies provide different procedures to estimate the pressure distribution and wave-induced loads on coastal structures, e.g. seawalls, vertical cylinders, platforms, bridges, piers, jetties, and crown walls. In these studies, the relevant effect on the type of breaking, as well as wave type, is thoroughly analyzed, although in several occasions over-simplified. Moreover, the effect of relative structure elevation, threedimensional (3D) flow alteration, as well as waterborne debris, remain largely unexplored. This study describes an extensive series of large-scale experiments to create a comprehensive dataset to derive horizontal and vertical wave forces on elevated coastal structures subject to the variability of storm waves, surge, and tsunamis, incorporating the effect of the relative structure elevation (air-gap), breaking type (nonbreaking, breaking, or broken), 3D flow alteration due to near-structure shielding, and waterborne debris. Papers already published (Park et al., 2017) and under preparation include a detailed description of the experimental procedures, model layout, instrumentation and dataset characteristics. The work also include the description of the different wave and water level conditions tested, and the uncertainty analysis of the results via repeatability tests.
ABSTRACT
Coastal communities provide important economic, transport, and recreational services to large numbers of people worldwide. However, these coastal communities are vulnerable to damage by extreme events such as tropical cyclones or tsunamis. Waves and surge, as well as tsunami-wave events, may cause extensive damage to elevated structures through a combination of horizontal and vertical wave and surge-induced forces. Structural elevation has been shown to be a critical variable affecting damage and loss. Recent efforts have been made to retrofit structures or improve coastal protection and damage mitigation plans in coastal communities to increase community resilience. However, to effectively retrofit old structures or design new structures to resist damage due to hurricanes or tsunamis, engineers require an accurate estimation of both the wave hydrodynamics and the resulting loads. Several theoretical, empirical, numerical, and experimental studies provide different procedures to estimate the pressure distribution and wave-induced loads on coastal structures, e.g. seawalls, vertical cylinders, platforms, bridges, piers, jetties, and crown walls. In these studies, the relevant effect on the type of breaking, as well as wave type, is thoroughly analyzed, although in several occasions over-simplified. Moreover, the effect of relative structure elevation, threedimensional (3D) flow alteration, as well as waterborne debris, remain largely unexplored. This study describes an extensive series of large-scale experiments to create a comprehensive dataset to derive horizontal and vertical wave forces on elevated coastal structures subject to the variability of storm waves, surge, and tsunamis, incorporating the effect of the relative structure elevation (air-gap), breaking type (nonbreaking, breaking, or broken), 3D flow alteration due to near-structure shielding, and waterborne debris. Papers already published (Park et al., 2017) and under preparation include a detailed description of the experimental procedures, model layout, instrumentation and dataset characteristics. The work also include the description of the different wave and water level conditions tested, and the uncertainty analysis of the results via repeatability tests.
[ 2018-iccea.pdf ]
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